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Rear window essay topics thesis on impact of interest rate on stock market

Rear window essay topics

Each school may express these points differently, however at the end of the day, teachers and examiners are all looking for the same thing:. An understanding of social, cultural or religious background in the text and how that shapes the themes, ideas, and characters. Without a clear understanding of the context of your text, you cannot fully comprehend the views and values of the author, nor the overall meaning of a text.

Writers use literature to criticise or endorse social conditions, expressing their own opinions and viewpoints of the world they live in. It is important to remember that each piece of literature is a deliberate construction. Every decision a writer makes reflects their views and values about their culture, morality, politics, gender, class, history or religion. This is implicit within the style and content of the text, rather than in overt statements.

An understanding of how different readers and develop different interpretations, and how this changes an author's message. Like our example using Austen vs. For example, the use of the word 'bright' vs. A high-graded English essay will cover all of these points without fail. If you're unfamiliar with any of these, you are missing out on ways to differentiate yourself from other students. At the end of the day, there are only so many themes and characters to discuss, so you need to find unique angles to discuss these themes and characters.

This will help your essay move from generic to original yeah boy! The ebook includes:. Click here to access the FULL version now! Go Went Gone revolves around an unlikely connection between a retired university professor , Richard, and a group of asylum seekers who come from all over the African continent. Richard initially sets out to learn their stories, but he is very quickly drawn into their histories of tragedy, as well as their dreams for the future.

This novel, therefore, bears reflection on our own relationship with the refugees who seek protection and opportunity on our shores - refugees who are virtually imprisoned and cut off from the world. Richard ultimately realises that these men are simply people , people who have the same complexities and inconsistencies as anyone else. They sometimes betray his trust; at other times, they help him in return despite their socio-economic standing.

In one example, a group of asylum seekers in a repurposed nursing home learn to conjugate the verb in German. In another, a retired university professor reflects on this group, about to be relocated to another facility. The various privileges Richard holds shape his identity in this text. Freedom in general is a useful way to think about privilege in this text, and besides freedom to choose how you spend your time, this can also look like the freedom to tell your story. While Richard helps the men with this to some degree, even he has a limited amount of power here and power can be another useful way of thinking about privilege.

He demonstrates a willingness to help them in quite substantial ways sometimes, for example buying a piece of land in Ghana for Karon and his family. In the end, we see him empathising with the refugees enough to offer them housing: though he is not a lawyer, he still finds ways to use his privilege for good and share what he can. He taps into his networks and finds housing for refugees. This can challenge him, and us, and our assumptions about what is right.

When Richard loses his wallet at the store, Rufu offers to pay for him. Erpenbeck challenges us to empathise without dehumanising, condescending or assuming anything in the process. Freedom of movement is sort of a form of privilege, but movement as a theme of its own is substantial enough to need a separate section.

There are lots of different forms of movement in the novel, in particular movement between countries. Through this lens, we can see that this is really more of a luxury that the refugees simply do not have. To yourself and others. Many of the barriers faced by the refugees are reflected in their relationships with language; that is, their experiences learning German mirrors and sheds light on their relationship with other elements of German society.

In this sense, the law mirrors and enables the callousness which runs through the halls of power - not to deter you from learning law if you want though! These symbols thus reflect power and privilege. This complex understanding of borders draws on the history of Germany , and in particular of its capital Berlin, after World War II.

The Eastern half of Germany, and the Eastern half of Berlin, fell under Soviet control, and as East Germans started flocking to the West in search of better opportunities sound familiar? The Berlin Wall , built in , became a border of its own, dividing a nation and a city and changing the citizenship of half of Germany overnight. Attempts to escape from the East continued for many years until the wall came down in , changing all those citizenships right back, once again virtually overnight.

This helps to illustrate that national borders are just another arbitrary technicality that divides people, at the expense of these refugees. This has a few layers of meaning. Erpenbeck questions the limits of human empathy - whose deaths are we more affected by, and why - through contrasting these different bodies of water, and those who die within them.

Often, that experience ends in death. Erpenbeck asks us to keep looking beneath the surface in order to empathise in full. Here are some questions to think about before diving into essay-writing. You may want to write some answers down, and brainstorm links between your responses and the novel. This prompt alludes to certain assumptions that Richard might make about the world. Then it asks us how the people Richard meets challenges those assumptions.

These experiences could be with language, employment, or personal relationships just to name a few ideas. However, I also think that his interest in the refugees exists because he knows they can challenge his assumptions. I want to use the motif of water surfaces to tie this argument together, particularly in the topic sentences, and this could look as follows:. Paragraph 3 : Richard is more open than most people to looking beneath the surface though, meaning that his assumptions are challenged partly because he is willing for them to be.

Writing a film analysis can be daunting in comparison to analysing a written text. As the blinds roll up to reveal the apartment complex, a medium shot of the wide-open windows of each apartment immediately convey to the audience an environment of an uncomfortable openness. However, despite this, the separation of each apartment by brick walls as a separate entity on its own serves as a symbol of the widespread suspicion characteristic of the McCarthyian era.

Within the frame of the main window, the windows of each apartment act as mini frames within the big frame, multiplying the sense of voyeurism present in the shot. Although seemingly insignificant, the brown tabby cat that runs across the steps of Greenwich Village represents freedom and individual autonomy, later comparable to the character of Lisa in the film. The compounding sense of surveillance during the s add more meaning to the freedom symbolised by the cat, which can then be contrasted to the suppressed independence of the protagonist, who is seen invalid in a wheelchair in the next shot:.

By this extreme close-up shot of Jeff sleeping in his wheelchair during the opening sequence, Hitchcock immediately places the viewer in an uncomfortable position as the original and ultimate voyeur, surpassing the intimate boundaries of the protagonist.

The stifling temperature of the season foreshadows imminent tension about to unfold in the film, as does the following close-up shot:. This close shot of a destroyed, seemingly irreparable camera, literally reflects the cyclic nature of broken dreams characteristic of Greenwich Village, and also signifies that Jeff too has been hurt literally by radical pursuits in his progression. Despite varying in size and setting, they all share a single point of similarity; they all focus on sights of destruction, such as the race car crash or the remains of a volcanic eruption.

The last photograph the camera focuses on in the opening sequence is the picture taken by Jeff of an elegant woman, who bears a striking resemblance to Lisa. Want to save this for later? Download a PDF version of this blog here. Often, beginning a Language Analysis essay can be tough.

How do you start? Do you even need to write an introduction? If you exemplify consideration of the information provided to you in your analysis, you will show a deeper understanding of the issue, and your analysis will be more accurate and detailed.

Aim to demonstrate that you understand why the article was written, and its surrounding circumstances. This gives the article a wider context, and helps the audience understand why the author may have a certain viewpoint. It is also good practice to properly reference the article in your analysis, which includes the date, author, source and title. The form of a Language Analysis text can vary, from newspaper articles, blogs, comics or even speeches.

Each form has its own set of conventions which can help you identify language techniques, and can change the way the message is communicated to the audience. For example, in a speech, the speaker is more likely to directly address their audience than the editor of a newspaper may in an editorial. When writing a Language Analysis essay or any essay for that matter , always refer to the author by either their full name, their surname only, or a title and a surname - NEVER by their first name alone.

For example: 'Lyle Shelton', 'Mr. Lyle Shelton', 'Mr. Shelton' and 'Shelton' are all okay to use in your essay. However, you would never use 'Lyle' on its own. The source of a text can influence your understanding of the audience. For example, an article written on a blog about gardening is likely to have a different audience to a financial journal.

Including the source is also an important so that the article is properly referenced. Including the title in the introduction is critical to properly introducing the article. Remember to analyse major techniques in the title if there are any during the body of your essay!

Depending on the audience, different techniques and appeals may work in different ways. For example, an appeal to the hip-pocket nerve is more likely to have an effect on single parents who are struggling financially than it is on young children or very wealthy people. However, identifying the tone early on is important so that you can later acknowledge any tonal shifts. Often, articles will include some sort of graphic; it is important that you acknowledge this in your introduction and give a brief description of the image - enough so your analysis can be read and understood on its own.

The description of the image is the equivalent of an embedded quote from an article; both are used to provide evidence to support your analysis. Don't be put-off by the name; you don't need to be studying cartoons specifically in order to learn heaps from this blog post. So keep watching or reading! If you were to put these lenses on, how would it change your interpretation of the text?

I touch more on feminist and ecocritical lenses at the end of the video above :. This prompt specifies two characters — Dixon-Brown and Piper — and therefore mandates an in-depth discussion of them within your essay. However, it is important to be careful of focusing exclusively on the explicitly mentioned characters when given a character prompt.

After all, while Dixon-Brown and Piper are both very important to Extinction, they are not the only relevant characters! In order to ensure that your discussion covers enough of the text, make sure your brainstorming stage includes the ideas and themes exemplified by the unmentioned characters , and how they relate to the ones that are specified.

Body Paragraph 1: Contemporary demands for female competitiveness undoubtedly underlie the dynamics between Dixon-Brown and Piper Ross. Body Paragraph 3: Conversely, while the spheres of politics certainly overlap occasionally within feminism and the question of female competition, they nevertheless form a largely distinct motivation behind the conflict between Piper and Dixon-Brown.

For further reading see our Extinction blog post where we cover themes, characters, symbolism and more! And for more essay help, you'll definitely want to take a look at Risini's fully annotated Extinction essay. In it, we teach you to think like a 50 study scorer through advanced discussions on things like structural feature analysis, views and values, different interpretations and critical readings. It's filled with unique advice that takes you from start to finish in mimicking the techniques used by a perfect-scorer VCE Year 12 student.

You may want to start off reading Our Ultimate Guide to Oral Presentations and come back to this blog if you haven't already! Once you've chosen an interesting topic and have researched all of its different viewpoints, it's time to formulate your contention. Often, creating a killer contention is about avoiding some common traps that will make your overall presentation boring, bland and just like the rest of your cohorts'.

This is simply not a contention! A contention is an opinion. There are no differing viewpoints against your contention which means that you have nothing to argue against. When climate change first came onto the radar, the main debate was whether it was a real or a conspiracy theory. These days with the exception of climate change skeptics of course , discussion on climate change revolves more heavily around the slow pace of policy implementation, intergenerational effects of climate change, and mental health surrounding climate change.

Now it's your turn. Give it a go! You might need to take a few tries to get your contention right, and that's absolutely OK. Wondering where to go from here? Sounds like something that'd help you? I think so too! Access the full eBook by clicking here! The banter between Beatrice and Benedick is amusing and ridiculous, and the ensuing drama between Hero and Claudio is probably not far off the modern drama in the relationships of your friends. Much Ado About Nothing explores themes of love, the ways that we can be opposed to love and relationships, the position of women and necessity of marriage, and the ways we can deceive each other and ourselves.

Love is a beautiful and yet frustratingly unavoidable part of life, and Shakespeare shows us the many ways in which people can react to this and manipulate this for their own desires. This play uses comedy to reassure us that mistakes and misunderstandings in love are an innate part of humanity, as we struggle to communicate how we feel towards another person.

Further, it is a play about how we stage these relationships to one another and questions whether true love needs an audience at all. Marriage acts as the primary source of the drama that unfolds in the play, and the main factor that drives its romantic plot forward.

Much Ado About Nothing explores the paramount importance the Elizabethan society placed upon the notion of marriage, and the threat this often placed upon the free will of many individuals. Shakespeare assumes an arguably feminist stance in his implied denouncement of this despotic treatment of women, who were expected to lose all social standing if they happened to lose their virginity before marriage. False language in Much Ado About Nothing is so prevalent that it obliterates the truth and forms an alternate kind of society, in which characters assume the very roles chosen for them by the lies spread about them by others.

The defining characteristic of Much Ado About Nothing is that nothing of material actually happens in the plot, other than marriage. Beards act as a complex emblem of masculinity in Much Ado About Nothing. This suggests that while it may seem like an intimidating and suffocating prospect, marriage can also provide infinite warmth and comfort to those who embrace it.

How does Shakespeare use music and poetry to convey love and the intricacies of communication? Discuss Shakespeare's use of symbols throughout the play and how they relate to the concepts of appearance and reality. Shakespeare in Much Ado About Nothing utilises the character of Beatrice as the quintessential strong female hero, and thus encourages female autonomy. In tandem with this, the character of Hero is employed as an instrument through which Shakespeare condemns the harsh societal expectations of women.

Ultimately, the repeatedly negative connotations of marriage expressed by female characters highlights the lack of autonomy women possessed in the Shakespearean era. In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare argues that deception always results in negative consequences. Despite this, deception is not always detrimental in Much Ado About Nothing , in which deliberate trickery leads to the resolution of the main romantic conflict between Beatrice and Benedick.

Now it's your turn! Give these essay topics a go. Check it out here. How to embed quotes in your essay like a boss. Given the richness in cultural backgrounds of VCE students cohort, EAL is designed to mend the linguistic gaps between local students and those from non-English speaking backgrounds. Students eligible to complete EAL are those who have no more than 7 years residency in a predominately English-speaking country AND no more than 7 years having English as their main language of instructions.

So how exactly is this subject easier, or is this just some unproven prejudice? This purpose holds even greater significance to students from non-English speaking backgrounds, as those skills offered by English subjects are essential to their life in Australia. The only difference is in Unit 3 , where EAL students are required to do a Listening task, whereas mainstream students study an additional text.

This is where you will listen to two texts twice each , take quick notes and fill in short-answers. Listening, therefore, is viewed by many as the least difficult compared to other tasks, because all you need to do is hear people speak English — something students do everyday. Yet it is absolutely not easy at all to attain a perfect score on this component! You have to pick up the right information from bunches of words, structure your response well so that the examiner understands what you try to convey, pay attention to paralinguistic elements tone, volume, pitch… , etc.

All of these skills can never be acquired without persistent practice. In place of Listening component, mainstream English students get to do creative response to a different text. Overall, they have similar components, except for the orange-shaded cells. Section C often has similar texts in both exams, with some modifications in language expression. Both exams are to be done in 3 hours, non-stop! So yep, EAL students get to write fewer essays and have lower word limit than mainstream students.

My personal opinion is: NO. The reason being learning a language that is not your mother-tongue is really never easy. Australian students doing VCE French will definitely agree with me! Given a large number of EAL students is international students, this subject can be a challenge to them. Yes, Listening might be easier than comparing texts, but taking super quick notes, picking the correct piece of info, paying attention to the way the speech is delivered, watching out for traps… are not that simple!

For those eligible for both English and EAL, you might be tempted to go for EAL, but my advice is to consult available resources the study design, this blog, teachers, peers… before making a decision so as to figure out which style of learning best suits you.

Priam is an elderly king of Troy. After the death of his son Hector, Priam envisions himself in plain clothing, riding a plain cart to Achilles who is effectively holding Hector ransom. Though the royal family is doubtful of his plan to save Hector, Priam is resolute and insists that he needs to try his best to confront Achilles as a father, rather than as king. After many decades as king of Troy, Priam is determined to reinvent how he will be remembered; as a king who performed an extraordinary act of heroism in order to save his beloved son.

Achilles is known as the greatest warrior of the Greeks. The death of Patroclus, his closest companion and hinted lover, drives Achilles to insanity. Hector murdered Patroclus and, as a result, Achilles takes revenge by killing Hector. Achilles loses his sense of humanity as he is possessed by his rage, hatred and grief. He is chosen to escort Priam to Achilles. He often engages in useless chatter and performs daily activities in a way that is foreign to the king. Although Somax is far from royalty, his great deal of affection for his daughter-in-law and granddaughter teaches Priam about love, family and life.

She accompanies Priam and Somax on their journey to the Greek camp where Achilles resides. He is kind, brave and noble without any cruel intentions, unlike his rival Achilles. During a battle between the Trojans and the Greeks, Hector kills Patroclus.

Ransom explores who we are and what it means to have an identity. As the leader of Troy for many decades, Priam has always viewed himself as a king. It appears as though Priam has been unhappy with his identity for quite some time, is physically weak, and feels as though he cannot protect his kingdom as efficiently as he used to.

His search for Hector is also a search for himself, to reinvent who he is and how he wishes others to remember him. Unexpectedly, this one idea propels Priam into a multitude of other changes. His journey with Somax teaches Priam a far greater deal than he had anticipated, for he learns to appreciate the value of the human connection and other daily simplicities in life.

This transformation, from a human who responds to grief with vengeance to someone who releases and forgives, demonstrates the benefits we can gain from amending our ways. Revenge is portrayed as a never-ending vicious cycle until both parties reach a negotiation or peace. Although he is successful in murdering Hector, Achilles does not follow the custom of leaving the body for the grieving family to bury.

Instead, Achilles feels the need to mutilate the body day after day without any sense of remorse or regret. His sense of loss is shown as he reflects feeling empty inside, to the point where he no longer feels like himself, but someone else altogether. The role of the gods is heavily woven into the events that unfold in Ransom.

During his journey, a jovial young man who joins the travellers is revealed as Hermes, a god who has come to safely guide the elderly men to Achilles. The power of the gods in controlling human fate is illustrated during the scene where Hermes saves the travellers from being swept away by a stream.

Even when confronted with doubt and hesitancy from his family, it is Priam who pushes onwards to fulfil his vision. Whether his actions were already predestined or of his own agency is up to you to decide. Time moves on beyond our lives as we are forgotten over decades and centuries while nature prevails.

Malouf demonstrates that in the end, life just is — we are granted by nature to have a brief existence, yet in the end, nature and time will move forward without us. For the first time, Priam is exposed to the different interests and values of the common man and is intrigued by the simplicities of life. It is Somax, a mere old man from the marketplace, who teaches Priam more about life than he had imagined possible.

The twelve-spoked wheels are elaborately carved and painted, a wickerwork canopy covers the tray'. On all occasions, the king had used this elegant cart to alert others that royalty was present. The use of this cart demonstrates how Priam has been encapsulated in his own royal sphere since everything is meticulously chosen and designed specifically for the king. At the beginning of the journey, Priam is characterised with childish traits. For Somax, the little griddlecakes are a regular and delectable snack, yet Priam 'ha[s] never seen them before'.

He had previously never noticed that there was so much preparation and work that went into the food that appeared at his table, let alone the ingredients and thickness of a batter. Achilles, the greatest warrior of the Greeks, stands next to the sea while reminiscing about the past.

The death of Patroclus left Achilles with an overwhelming sense of loss and also burning animosity. Hector, the son of Trojan king Priam and leader of the Trojan army, wore Achilles' armour as a sign of triumph and disrespect for the Greeks. In a dramatic battle between Hector and himself, Achilles was successful in killing his enemy. For Achilles however, this was not enough. Along with the conflict between Greece and Troy, Ransom also delves into the consequences of those affected by the war.

As the greatest warrior of all Greeks, Achilles has lived his life as a fighter. While warriors are known for sacrificing their lives in the battlefield, Achilles does not literally refer to warriors confronting death each time they fight for their team. Furthermore, Achilles grieves for his mother in the opening passages of Ransom. If you'd like to read more of my analysis, feel free to access a sample of our ebook A Killer Text Guide: Ransom. Power-up your learning with free essay topics, downloadable word banks, and updates on the latest VCE strategies.

Unfortunately, we won't be able to answer any emails here requesting personal help with your study or homework here! All Rights Reserved. Address: We'd love to see you too, but we're only online! Our tutors meet students at homes and local libraries. Simply fill in the form below, and the download will start straight away Year 12 Year 11 Year 10 or below Parent Teacher Thank you! Your download should start now. Want insider tips? Sign up here! Go ahead and tilt your mobile the right way portrait.

The kool kids don't use landscape Historial Context Before getting into the nitty-gritty of the film, it is crucial to understand a bit about its historical context. Yes, I'd love a free mini-guide! June 26, Main Characters Kip Westaway 'Mr. Husting always says first impressions count' p. I know the web of them, every lane in Richmond. On account of a book' p. And they want me, Francis Westaway!

Away from home in a world of strangers. Our little secret. Crouch, p. Working your youth away, looking after an old man. You should have a family of your own by now. I spare her nothing. I say loose women and no morals and I say bastard and I say slut. I would have been around six or seven. I was picked last for some team.

That was me, the kid without a father. For once in your life, do not be a pussy. Literary Devices Allusion Throughout her perspective driven text, Jordan makes many references to classic novels which help create a literary context for the narrative and lend themselves to the evolution of the characters throughout the course of the text. Its use pertains to how Jack feels out of place in his home town after leaving a boy and returning a grown man.

Genre A historical novel that plays with ideas of placing invented characters into a reconstructed world of the past. Uses elements of both realism and impressionism to create the text. Realist Elements: A strong focus on everyday life within a particular society with reference to real historical detail. Incorporates a logical and strong foundation of context that can be easily digested and believed by the reader.

Can use an omniscient narrator all-knowing. Impressionist Elements: Each chapter offers detail and presents a vivid interpretation of specific events. Sensory experiences are emphasised by the use of descriptive and poetic language.

The linear flow of the narrative is disrupted by its construction in a non-chronological order, thereby forcing the reader to piece the whole narrative together at the end. Language is used to historicise each chapter through use of slang, colloquialisms, formal and proper English.

Rather than them move or the location change it evolves, paralleling the growth and evolution undergone by each of the Westaway family members. Structure Inspired by a photograph in the collection of Argus war photos held at the State Library of Victoria, Jordan uses this image capturing a private and intimate moment to establish the premise for each of the book's chapters.

Titled Nine Days and composed of nine unique perspectives on life at a given time, Jordan offers insight into the emotional livelihood of each narrator and attaches both intimate and historical significance to their stories. Do you agree? To what extent do you agree? The mood by the end of Nine Days is ultimately uplifting and positive.

There is more tragedy in Nine Days than there is joy. Discuss Jordan suggests that appreciation of family is integral to personal happiness. There are many characters who are largely hidden figures within the text. What significance is produced by including and excluding different perspectives? February 15, Study Tips. Step 2: Read Around Your Text While reading and rereading your text will definitely help you to know your text in and out, in order to fully tick the box of knowledge and understanding, it is also important to read around the text; to understand the context of when and why the text was written, for whom it was written, and the impact the text has had on both its original audience and its audience today.

No character in Rear Window is morally clean, and through several cinematic techniques, Hitchcock compels viewers to sympathize with nearly all of them. His examination of the idea of surveillance and privacy, plays into the current American debate of the rise of the surveillance. Sitting alone, trapped inside my home watching my neighbors movements day by day.

This setting is a description a scenes in the plot of the films, Rear Window by Alfred Hitchcock and Disturbia by D. J Carusso The two films, both contain a vast amount of voyeurism presented in different ways. In both films women are treated rude, disrespectfully and are victims of violence. In Rear Window, Hitchcock uses visuals in order to capture the perfect cinematic film and experience.

We as the viewers identify with Jeff because much like how he is watching his neighbors, we are also speculating his life as a film. Our hero, L. Rear Window Essay. Page 1 of 50 - About essays. Dichotomy In Rear Window Words 4 Pages Alfred Hitchcock once defined his film Rear Window Hitchcock, , as the story of a man who cannot move and looks through a window, about what he sees and how he reacts to it Truffaut, At the beginning of the Continue Reading.

Arousal is dependent upon the Continue Reading. Analysis Of The Movie Rear Window Words 5 Pages Rear Window directed by Alfred Hitchcock is revered as one of the greatest movies in American Cinema; every shot and plot point in the story considered a work of art from the creative mind of the ambitious director.

Further in this essay, I will summarize the plots, discuss the styles used, and deconstruct parts of the Continue Reading. His examination of the idea of surveillance and privacy, plays into the current American debate of the rise of the surveillance Continue Reading.

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So to speak. Evidently, this is a major moral dilemma. If you suspect that someone has committed murder, does this give you the right to disregard their privacy and surveil them in this way? In some ways, the audience is also positioned to reflect on this question, and in particular, reflect on the paranoia that characterised and defined the McCarthy era. Somewhat separate to these questions is the romance between Jeff and Lisa, since Hitchcock seems to keep the thriller storyline and the romance storyline separate for a large part of the film.

Their contrasting lifestyles and world views present a major obstacle in the fulfilment of their romance, and the murder mystery both distracts and unites them. The cinematographic techniques employed in Rear Window are important ways of shaping our understanding of the film, and Hitchcock uses a wide array of visual cues to communicate certain messages. Lighting is one such cue that he uses a lot - it is said that at certain points in filming, he had used every single light owned by the studio in which this film was shot.

In this film, lighting is used to reveal things: when the lights are on in any given apartment, Jeff is able to peer inside and watch through the window almost resembling a little TV screen; Jeff is also able to channel surf through the various apartments - Hitchcock uses panning to show this. On the contrary, a lack of lighting is also used to hide things, and we see Thorwald utilise this at many stages in the film. Jeff also takes advantage of this, as he often sits in a position where he is very close to being in the shadows himself; if he feels the need, he is able to retreat such that he is fully enshrouded.

Low-key lighting in these scenes also contributes to an overall sense of drama and tension. Another handy visual cue is the cross-cut , which is an example of the Kuleshov effect. The Kuleshov effect is an editing technique whereby a sequence of two shots is used to convey information more effectively than just a single shot. Specifically, the cross-cut shifts from a shot of a person to a second shot of something that this person is watching.

By the way, to download a PDF version of this blog for printing or offline use, click here! That being said, one of the benefits of studying a film is that these symbols tend to be quite visual - you are able to see these recurring images and this may make them easier to spot.

Because he has been rendered immobile by his leg, readers can infer from this symbol that he is also incapable of working or even leaving his apartment, let alone solving a murder mystery. The broken leg is in this sense a symbol of his powerlessness and the source of much of his discontent. Another interpretation of the broken leg however, is that it represents his impotence which on one hand is synonymous for powerlessness or helplessness, but is on the other hand an allusion to his apparent inability to feel sexual desire.

Being constantly distracted from Lisa by other goings-on in the courtyard definitely supports this theory. It is the main means through which he observes other people, and thus, it also symbolises his voyeuristic tendencies - just as his broken leg traps and inhibits him, his camera lens transports him out of his own apartment and allows him to project his own fears and insecurities into the apartments of his neighbours, watching them for entertainment, for visual pleasure.

In this latter sense, the camera lens can also be understood as a phallic symbol, an erection of sorts. Her initial wardrobe represents her elegance and refinery whilst also communicating a degree of incompatibility with Jeff. However, as she changes and compromises throughout the film, her wardrobe also becomes much more practical and much less ostentatious as the film wears on, until she is finally wearing a smart blouse, jeans and a pair of loafers.

The change in her wardrobe reflects changes in her character as well. Finally, the wedding ring of Mrs Thorwald is hugely significant; wedding rings in general represent marriage and commitment, and are still very important symbols that people still wear today. Now it's your turn to give these essay topics a go!

In our ebook A Killer Text Guide: Rear Window , we've take 5 of these essay topics and show you our analysis, brainstorm and plan for each individual topic. These ABC components are:. While we should use film techniques as part of our evidence repertoire in each essay, this particular type of essay prompt literally begs for it. Contention: Through a diverse range of film techniques, Hitchcock instils fear and apprehension into the audience of Rear Window.

P1: The opening sequence of Rear Window employs various film techniques to immediately establish underlying tension in its setting. If you find this helpful, then you might want to check out our A Killer Text Guide: Rear Window ebook, which has all the information and resources you need to succeed in your exam, with detailed summaries and background information, as well as a detailed analysis of all five essay prompts!

Download a PDF version of this blog for printing or offline use. Now quite sure how to nail your text response essays? Then download our free mini-guide, where we break down the art of writing the perfect text-response essay into three comprehensive steps. Click below to get your own copy today! You [men] can do almost anything you care to think of. Now I know what it feels like to want and I will give anything to have it' p. I have to leave the room. Blam, splashed his brains all over the road.

A sad end. Best behaviour in front of my father, children all brought up in the church by him. It has a silver chain threaded through a hole in the middle. Instead I concentrate on the scene the scene in front of me so I can remember it later. The theme of family is a recurring one that develops over time.

The juxtaposition of family life in this way allows the reader to see how such factors like wealth, class and reputation can affect the family dynamic especially within the war period. The idea of family is strained by the pressures of war because with many families' sons and husbands away it left the other family members to adopt other roles - not only physically, but the conventional emotional roles of traditional families of the time are redistributed, specifically within the Westaway household.

Jordan highlights the controversial issues of premarital sex, abortion and the rights of women within the mid 20th and early 21st century. Indeed, it is this theme of women that becomes inextricably linked with the effect of a damaged reputation. The issue of abortion is later revisited when Charlotte becomes pregnant in the s, where the contrast between the time periods becomes evident; while unplanned pregnancy is greatly stigmatised in the s, the s offers Charlotte a far wider array of options.

Within the parameters of her text, Jordan articulates how men conform or reject masculine tropes in an effort to fit into society. Toughness, bulling and unsavory activity are presented as the characteristics of a man through such depictions of Mac and his gang. In its connection to the war period, the novel partly focuses on the notion that in order to be classified as a man he must first go through struggle and hardship as presented in the group of strangers taunting Jack, ultimately bullying him into certain ideals of masculinity which prove toxic and consequential - Jack dies as a result.

The derogative slang used for the Japanese represents a lack of understanding and fear the bombing of Darwin and attack on Sydney left many feeling particularly vulnerable to the Japanese. Exacerbated by the fact that Japanese culture was not widely understood and was often misrepresented, the Japanese were stereotyped as brutal and inhuman. Over the course of the novel, attitudes towards Asia dramatically shift especially within the early s of Stanzi and Charlotte's generation.

The philosophical ideas of the east are often referenced by characters like Charlotte as she draws on them to make sense of her own complex life. The novel sees another shift in ideology represented through Alec as his generation's perception turns to a more commercial view. Asian culture has earned a place in mainstream media and western life without such gruesome and violent connotations as were previously held during the time of World War II.

But…the minute you sit down at your desk, you find that your mind goes completely blank and that you are left only with one dreadful question: What now? If this sounds all too familiar to you, you are definitely not alone. So, here is a quick guide that can help you to plan out your year, to break free from procrastination and to find some sparks of motivation when you feel like there is simply no road ahead. This may seem like the most obvious step, but it can make all the difference when done thoughtfully and thoroughly.

One thing that VCAA English examiners always look for when reading text responses is in-depth knowledge and understanding of the text, and the best way to develop and gain this knowledge is to read, read, and read again! Try to treat your text like a blank map, full of unexplored territories and winding roads that are there for you to uncover each time you read the text. When you read your text for the first time, look out for the major roads and landmarks; the setting and premise, the plot, the characters, the broad ideas, the authorial voice and style etc.

While reading and rereading your text will definitely help you to know your text in and out, in order to fully tick the box of knowledge and understanding, it is also important to read around the text; to understand the context of when and why the text was written, for whom it was written, and the impact the text has had on both its original audience and its audience today. Especially for texts that are rooted in history, like The Women of Troy or Rear Window , understanding context and background information is essential in understanding the text itself.

Each text is a product of both its creator and its time, so make the effort to research the writer, playwright or filmmaker , and the historical, cultural, social and political context of your text. Studying a subject with as large of a cohort as VCE English can oftentimes mean that ideas are recycled and exams are repetitive, so in order to distinguish yourself from the pack, try to look for ways to craft your own original path ; a view of the text that is distinctly your own, instead of following others.

The best way to do this is to do a bit of thinking at home; to create your own original set of notes and observations and to spend time analysing each section of your text in greater detail than you may have done in class. Constructing a notes table like the one below can help you greatly in sorting and fleshing out your ideas, and, when done consistently throughout the year, can save a lot of time and effort when it comes to studying for the exam!

You may be feeling nervous at this point, even a little burnt out, but there is no need to worry. Demonstrates the dehumanisation of the Trojan women, and the heinous, beastly actions of the Greek men, who, like their 'war machine' description, have subverted all that is natural to become violent, and all that is beautiful to become grotesque.

Rather than slaving away for hours and hours writing full essays, these simpler forms of targeted study can and will save you the burnout and will get you feeling confident faster. Only move on to writing a full practice essay or some practice paragraphs once you feel you have a good in-depth understanding of how to plan an essay and once you have already naturally memorised some important quotes that you can use in your essay learn how to embed your quotes like a boss here.

Remember, quality over quantity, so spend your time before your SAC revising thoughtfully and carefully, targeting your revision, and taking things slowly, rather than robotically churning out essay after essay. Preparing for it is also much less intense than you might think it to be, because essentially, from the very first time you read your text, you will have already begun preparing for the exam. All that is left to do before the English exam is to polish up on some of your weaknesses identified in your SACs, to look over all the notes and information you have gathered throughout the year, to freshen up on essay writing and essay planning , and to do a couple of practices, so that you can feel as ready as you can for the real thing.

In particular, I found that in the leadup to my English exam, studying with my friends and peers was not only a welcome stress reliever, but a really good way to expand my own knowledge by helping others and being helped myself. Hopefully, these tips will be able to help you out throughout the year in staying motivated and feeling okay about English!

Remember, this is just here as a guide to help you, and not a strict regimen to follow, because everyone studies differently, and has different goals in English. Our Ultimate Guide to Text Response and Ultimate Guide to Comparative give you a full rundown of what is required in these two areas of study where you will have to learn specific texts so I would highly recommend having a read!

In fact, the only materials that can be found on the internet are those analysing the older translation of the play titled The Trojan Women. That is why we are here to help you as much as we can by offering you a mini-guide for Women of Tro y, in the hope that you can get a head start with this play. Women of Troy is a tragedy which takes place in the immediate aftermath of the Trojan war, critiquing the atrocities committed by the Greeks to both people of Melos and Troy.

By constructing a play in which women are able to dominate the stage and exude their genuine despair in response to their impending enslavement, Euripides shifts the perspectives from epic tales of Greek and Trojan male heroes to the conversely affected women who suffered at the hands of the heroes, while simultaneously providing both the contemporary and modern audience with a unique insight into the true cost of war.

This is especially significant because the society was pervaded by patriarchal values, where women were subordinated to their male counterparts. The Trojan war occurred as a result of the conflict between Greece and Troy and was said to last for over 10 years. According to a tale, during a festival on the Olympus, Athena, Aphrodite and Hera were fighting over a golden apple. They chose a random mortal, which was Paris who would then be the Prince of Troy, to decide who the most beautiful goddess of the three was.

As a reward for picking her, Aphrodite promised Paris that he would be married to the most beautiful woman in the world, which was Helen — wife of Menelaus, the Spartan prince. Aphrodite had her son Eros a cupid enchant Helen and Paris so that they would fall endlessly in love with each other.

Menelaus was enraged and he convinced his brother Agamemnon to lead an expedition to retrieve Helen. The Greek army was commanded to attack the Trojans. The siege lasted for more than 10 years until the Greeks came up with a strategy to abduct Helen from the palace.

The Greek soldiers build a giant wooden horse and hid in there to get in the citadel of Troy, attacking them in the middle of the night and winning the war. After the war, the Greek heroes slowly made their way home, however, the journey home was not easy. Odysseus took 10 years to make the arduous journey home to Ithaca because Poseidon agreed to punish the Greeks for the atrocities committed before and after their victory.

He often criticises the goddess of love, Aphrodite, for enchanting mortals and leading them into a life governed by love and lust. This manoeuvres the audience into acknowledging the pointlessness of the Trojan war as it is not worth risking so many lives over Helen or any minor military conflict. In doing so, Euripides once again lambastes the actions of those vindictive and bloodthirsty Greeks. The play primarily focuses on the loss and pain of the Trojan civilians that survived the war, are sieged in the city after the war and are eventually either killed or enslaved after the fall of Troy.

While the Trojan war is the setting of many famous classical works being examined by various different angles, not many focus on the consequences suffered by women. You can also use the evidence from the above to justify your arguments on the cost of war.

They all aim to magnify the extent to which the Trojan people, as well as the Greeks, have to suffer as result of this pointless war. This is evidenced through the ways in which Hellenic people build temples and make sacrifices to the gods, thanking the gods for allowing them to live prosperous lives and begging for their forgiveness whenever they wrong others.

This is why it is significant when Hecuba referred to the gods as 'betrayers' in her lamentation, implying that there is a change in attitude in time of tragedy. Events such as this make people question their fate and belief, galvanising them to wonder 'what good [gods] were to [them]. Some characters in Women of Troy are also fundamentally driven by their sense of duty and integrity, and act according to their moral code regardless of what the circumstances may be.

Hecuba, for instance, sympathises with the Chorus of Troy and acts as a leader even when she loses her title and her home. She is held responsible for her actions but is still governed by her honesty and integrity as Helen makes her plea. Talthybius is also governed by both his sense of duty and integrity. However, he does not disregard her sense of morality and treats Hecuba with understanding and sensitivity. Helen, on the other hand, does not demonstrate the same degree of moral uprightness.

In time of tragedy, she chooses to lie and shift the blame to others to escape her execution. The prologue of the play opens with a conversation between Poseidon and Athena, foreshadowing their divine retribution against the Greeks. Witnessing the immediate aftermath of the Trojan war, they curse the war which they ironically themselves initiated, thus condemning the horrific injustice of the conflict and the actions of its vengeful and blood thirsty so-called heroes.

This is evidenced through the ways in which they punished Odysseus by creating obstacles on his journey home. However, it can also be argued that the gods in Women of Troy themselves act as a symbol of injustice in a way. The divine intervention which is promised in the beginning casts the following injustices cursed upon the women of Troy in a different light as it can be argued that the gods caused the war.

While their retribution against the Greeks can be seen as a means to punish the heroes, it is evident that that they are more concerned about the sacrilege committed and the disrespect they receive after the Trojan war than the injustices suffered by women. This thereby humanises the gods and fortifies the notion that they also have personal flaws and are governed by their ego and hubris.

It can be argued that the chain of unfortunate events are unpredictable as they are determined by gods, whose emotions and prejudices still control the way they act. On the other hand, the characters in the play do at times make choices that would lead to their downfall and tragic consequences.

For instance, it is Menelaus who decided to go after the Trojans just because of one woman and he was not enchanted or under any influence of divine intervention. Euripides centres his play on Trojan women, enabling the discussion on the cause and effect of war.

The protagonist Hecuba, for example, is portrayed as the archetypal mother. While this image is presented during the aftermath of the Trojan war, Euripides also uses Hecuba as a representative of contemporary Hellenic women as this archetype is universal for all circumstances.

This implies that the protagonist, in this instance, also acts as a diatribe against the patriarchal society which allows women to suffer greatly as a result of war and military conflict. Talthybius is sympathetic towards women, establishing himself as a complicated figure with a strong sense of integrity.

This is epitomised through the ways in which he employs euphemistic language when announcing the dreadful news to Hecuba. He was being sensitive and subtle instead of abruptly delivering the news. While he represents an enemy state, he shows that men can also be compassionate, contradicting the Phallocentric belief that men should only be governed by cool logic. It can be argued that Hecuba acts as the paradigm of the Trojan women as her pain i. The Chorus of the play often echoes her deepest pain, establishing a sense of camaraderie between female characters of the play.

In this play, the Chorus acts as the voice of the 'wretched women of Troy', representing the views of the unspoken who are objectified and mistreated by their male counterparts. After Troy lost the war, women were seen as conquests and were traded as slaves, exposing the unfair ethos of a society that was seen as the cradle of civilisation. By allowing the Trojan women to express their indignation and enmity as a response to their impending slavery, Euripides is able to present a critique on the ways in which women were oppressed in Ancient Greece.

Why are these important? Watch how we integrated literary devices as pieces of evidence in this essay topic breakdown:. TIP: See section ' 7. Staged in a patriarchal society, Women of Troy was set during the immediate aftermath of the Trojan war — a war between the Greeks and the Trojans. Hecuba is the former queen of Troy, who suffered so much loss as the mother of her children as well as the mother of Troy.

She lost her son Hector and her husband in the Trojan war, her daughter Polyxena also died and Cassandra was raped. After the Greeks won, women were allocated to Greek households and forced into slavery, including the queen of Troy. She was also the mother of Paris, the prince of Troy.

It was purported that Paris and Helen were responsible for initiating the war as Helen was governed by her lust for Paris and left Menelaus, the Spartan prince, for this young prince of Troy. Consequently, Menelaus was enraged by this elopement and declared that he wanted Helen dead as a punishment for her disloyalty. Helen defended herself and lied that it was against her will, crying that she was kidnapped and blamed Hecuba for the fall of Troy and for the conflict between the two sides.

However, Menelaus did not believe what Helen had to say and decided to bring her back to her home on a separate ship. The play ended with the Greek ships leaving Troy, which was then on fire. The Trojan were singing a sad song together as they left to prepare for their new lives as slaves living in Greek households. It requires you to have a much more profound knowledge of the text, and it is not always easy to spot language features, especially in a poetic sounding play like Women of Troy.

There is just so much going on in the text! These types of evidence are definitely worth looking for because they can also be used as evidence to back up your arguments for theme-based or character-based prompts learn more about the different types of prompts in How To Write A Killer Text Response.

The first thing I always do is to look for keywords. The key words in this prompt are 'structure, 'role of women' and 'suffering'. In a male-dominated, patriarchal society, women are oftentimes oppressed and seen as inferior. Their roles in the society were limited, they were only seen as domestic housewives and mothers.

It is important to look for evidence that either supports or contradicts this statement. Ask yourself:. It might include:. Once a prompt is carefully broken down, it is no longer that scary because all we have to do now is organise our thoughts and write our topic sentences. It is significant that Euripides chose to have a strong female protagonist, as the character herself acts as a diatribe against the patriarchal society, contradicting any engrained beliefs that pervaded the society at the time.

An example of evidence that can support this statement is the way in which Hecuba dominates the stage while giving her opening lamentation. The lengthy nature of the monologue itself enables Euripides to present his proto-feminist ideas and go against the Hellenic gendered prejudice. She refers to them as 'my children' and employs the simile 'a mother at her plundered nest'. The way the Greek playwright constructs the relationship between characters is worth mentioning as Hecuba in this play is portrayed as a compassionate and empathetic leader, showing that women are also capable of leading others in a way that engenders a sense of camaraderie between them.

Another good thinking point is to talk about how Helen acts as a paradigm of a group of women who had to turn to deception and go against their integrity to survive in time of tragedy. Another piece of evidence that I would talk about is the simile 'dragged as a slave'. It was used to describe Hecuba, the former queen of Troy.

By likening someone who used to be at a position of power to 'a slave', Euripides underscores the drastic change in circumstances that occurred as a result of the Trojan war, magnifying the tremendous amount of loss Hecuba experienced. There is, of course, plenty of other evidence out there such as the way in which Cassandra is portrayed as a 'poor mad child', her helplessness in surrendering to her 'wretched' fate with Agamemnon who wanted her for himself.

The use of symbolism can also be discussed. The last body paragraph of our essays is often the one used to challenge the prompt, showing the assessors our wealth of ideas and depth of knowledge. Basically, what we are saying is 'while our playwright is obviously pro-women, he definitely does not condone everything women do and criticise everything men do'. In this way, we have the opportunity to explore the ways characters are constructed and the ways they are used in the play to convey its meaning.

If I were to write an essay on this, I would talk about Talthybius and Helen, mainly because they are both complex characters that the audience cannot fully love or hate. Talthybius is surprisingly sympathetic towards women, establishing himself as a complicated figure. This is epitomised by the ways in which he employs euphemistic language when announcing the dreadful news to Hecuba.

Similar to Talthybius, Helen is also a complicated figure as she is both a victim of fate and a selfish character. It is possible for the audience to sympathise with her as she is merely a victim of fortune in that she was bewitched by Aphrodite and governed by her love for Paris, the prince of Troy.

However, the ways in which she shifts the blame to Hecuba and makes her pleas preclude the audience from completely sympathising with her they, in a way, render her as a self-absorbed and repugnant character. This notion is further fortified by the fact that she cared so little for the 'tens of thousands' lives taken on her behalf as the phrase quantifies and magnifies the cataclysmic consequences of her lust for Paris.

The quote mentions long-lasting sufferings , and the prompt seems to ask who suffers, and who is responsible. This is best done through how you thread your arguments together, and how you make those links. Hecuba and the Trojan women suffer, and they argue Helen is responsible - but Helen also suffers, and she argues that the gods are responsible. The gods, as we know, are insulated from suffering because of their divine and superhuman status.

So, are they the villains? This is a similar progression of ideas that we have seen before, but I want to ground them in this cycle of suffering-responsibility. P1: The eponymous women of Troy certainly suffer, and in many of their eyes, Helen is a villain. P2: However, Helen does not see herself that way - and she is not incorrect. She too seems to suffer, and she sees the gods as the main villains who are responsible.

The contention for this one will be: the Trojan War undoubtedly has its winners and losers, and few of these characters agree on who the responsible villains are, with some blaming Helen P1 while she herself blames the gods P2. However, the gods only form a part of the picture - rather, Euripides depicts war itself as the villain, lambasting those who take pride in inflicting cruelty in the midst of war P3. EXECUTE is the writing component that ticks off the English criteria so that your teacher is wowed by your essay and wished it was longer.

So, what are these criteria points? Each school may express these points differently, however at the end of the day, teachers and examiners are all looking for the same thing:. An understanding of social, cultural or religious background in the text and how that shapes the themes, ideas, and characters.

Without a clear understanding of the context of your text, you cannot fully comprehend the views and values of the author, nor the overall meaning of a text. Writers use literature to criticise or endorse social conditions, expressing their own opinions and viewpoints of the world they live in. It is important to remember that each piece of literature is a deliberate construction. Every decision a writer makes reflects their views and values about their culture, morality, politics, gender, class, history or religion.

This is implicit within the style and content of the text, rather than in overt statements. An understanding of how different readers and develop different interpretations, and how this changes an author's message. Like our example using Austen vs. For example, the use of the word 'bright' vs. A high-graded English essay will cover all of these points without fail. If you're unfamiliar with any of these, you are missing out on ways to differentiate yourself from other students.

At the end of the day, there are only so many themes and characters to discuss, so you need to find unique angles to discuss these themes and characters. This will help your essay move from generic to original yeah boy! The ebook includes:. Click here to access the FULL version now! Go Went Gone revolves around an unlikely connection between a retired university professor , Richard, and a group of asylum seekers who come from all over the African continent.

Richard initially sets out to learn their stories, but he is very quickly drawn into their histories of tragedy, as well as their dreams for the future. This novel, therefore, bears reflection on our own relationship with the refugees who seek protection and opportunity on our shores - refugees who are virtually imprisoned and cut off from the world. Richard ultimately realises that these men are simply people , people who have the same complexities and inconsistencies as anyone else.

They sometimes betray his trust; at other times, they help him in return despite their socio-economic standing. In one example, a group of asylum seekers in a repurposed nursing home learn to conjugate the verb in German.

In another, a retired university professor reflects on this group, about to be relocated to another facility. The various privileges Richard holds shape his identity in this text. Freedom in general is a useful way to think about privilege in this text, and besides freedom to choose how you spend your time, this can also look like the freedom to tell your story. While Richard helps the men with this to some degree, even he has a limited amount of power here and power can be another useful way of thinking about privilege.

He demonstrates a willingness to help them in quite substantial ways sometimes, for example buying a piece of land in Ghana for Karon and his family. In the end, we see him empathising with the refugees enough to offer them housing: though he is not a lawyer, he still finds ways to use his privilege for good and share what he can. He taps into his networks and finds housing for refugees. This can challenge him, and us, and our assumptions about what is right.

When Richard loses his wallet at the store, Rufu offers to pay for him. Erpenbeck challenges us to empathise without dehumanising, condescending or assuming anything in the process. Freedom of movement is sort of a form of privilege, but movement as a theme of its own is substantial enough to need a separate section. There are lots of different forms of movement in the novel, in particular movement between countries.

Through this lens, we can see that this is really more of a luxury that the refugees simply do not have. To yourself and others. Many of the barriers faced by the refugees are reflected in their relationships with language; that is, their experiences learning German mirrors and sheds light on their relationship with other elements of German society. In this sense, the law mirrors and enables the callousness which runs through the halls of power - not to deter you from learning law if you want though!

These symbols thus reflect power and privilege. This complex understanding of borders draws on the history of Germany , and in particular of its capital Berlin, after World War II. The Eastern half of Germany, and the Eastern half of Berlin, fell under Soviet control, and as East Germans started flocking to the West in search of better opportunities sound familiar?

The Berlin Wall , built in , became a border of its own, dividing a nation and a city and changing the citizenship of half of Germany overnight. Attempts to escape from the East continued for many years until the wall came down in , changing all those citizenships right back, once again virtually overnight. This helps to illustrate that national borders are just another arbitrary technicality that divides people, at the expense of these refugees. This has a few layers of meaning.

Erpenbeck questions the limits of human empathy - whose deaths are we more affected by, and why - through contrasting these different bodies of water, and those who die within them. Often, that experience ends in death. Erpenbeck asks us to keep looking beneath the surface in order to empathise in full.

Here are some questions to think about before diving into essay-writing. You may want to write some answers down, and brainstorm links between your responses and the novel. This prompt alludes to certain assumptions that Richard might make about the world. Then it asks us how the people Richard meets challenges those assumptions. These experiences could be with language, employment, or personal relationships just to name a few ideas. However, I also think that his interest in the refugees exists because he knows they can challenge his assumptions.

I want to use the motif of water surfaces to tie this argument together, particularly in the topic sentences, and this could look as follows:. Paragraph 3 : Richard is more open than most people to looking beneath the surface though, meaning that his assumptions are challenged partly because he is willing for them to be. Writing a film analysis can be daunting in comparison to analysing a written text. As the blinds roll up to reveal the apartment complex, a medium shot of the wide-open windows of each apartment immediately convey to the audience an environment of an uncomfortable openness.

However, despite this, the separation of each apartment by brick walls as a separate entity on its own serves as a symbol of the widespread suspicion characteristic of the McCarthyian era. Within the frame of the main window, the windows of each apartment act as mini frames within the big frame, multiplying the sense of voyeurism present in the shot. Although seemingly insignificant, the brown tabby cat that runs across the steps of Greenwich Village represents freedom and individual autonomy, later comparable to the character of Lisa in the film.

The compounding sense of surveillance during the s add more meaning to the freedom symbolised by the cat, which can then be contrasted to the suppressed independence of the protagonist, who is seen invalid in a wheelchair in the next shot:. By this extreme close-up shot of Jeff sleeping in his wheelchair during the opening sequence, Hitchcock immediately places the viewer in an uncomfortable position as the original and ultimate voyeur, surpassing the intimate boundaries of the protagonist.

The stifling temperature of the season foreshadows imminent tension about to unfold in the film, as does the following close-up shot:. This close shot of a destroyed, seemingly irreparable camera, literally reflects the cyclic nature of broken dreams characteristic of Greenwich Village, and also signifies that Jeff too has been hurt literally by radical pursuits in his progression.

Despite varying in size and setting, they all share a single point of similarity; they all focus on sights of destruction, such as the race car crash or the remains of a volcanic eruption. The last photograph the camera focuses on in the opening sequence is the picture taken by Jeff of an elegant woman, who bears a striking resemblance to Lisa.

Want to save this for later? Download a PDF version of this blog here. Often, beginning a Language Analysis essay can be tough. How do you start? At the beginning of the. Voyeurism is defined in The Penguin dictionary of psychology as: "Voyeurism: characterized by a pattern of sexual behaviour in which one's preferred means of sexual arousal is the clandestine observing of others when they are disrobing, nude or actually engaged in sexual activity. Arousal is dependent upon the.

Rear Window directed by Alfred Hitchcock is revered as one of the greatest movies in American Cinema; every shot and plot point in the story considered a work of art from the creative mind of the ambitious director. Due to this, it has been referenced many times in pop culture, TV shows, amongst other forms of media. One of these TV shows is the long-running titan of cartoons, The Simpsons. I chose to critique a movie called Rear Window, a realist film by Alfred Hitchcock produced in The genre is thriller and the sub genre suspense infused with mystery.

When a person watches it, he feels, tantalized, shocked, and exhilarated. Further in this essay, I will summarize the plots, discuss the styles used, and deconstruct parts of the. Rear Window Rear Window, tells the story about a photojournalist, L. Jeff is so used to being in the middle of all the danger and excitement while taking pictures and researching a story that now, he is so bored with being confined to his tiny apartment. No character in Rear Window is morally clean, and through several cinematic techniques, Hitchcock compels viewers to sympathize with nearly all of them.

His examination of the idea of surveillance and privacy, plays into the current American debate of the rise of the surveillance. Sitting alone, trapped inside my home watching my neighbors movements day by day.

This setting is a description a scenes in the plot of the films, Rear Window by Alfred Hitchcock and Disturbia by D. J Carusso The two films, both contain a vast amount of voyeurism presented in different ways.

ESSAY ON IMPORTANCE OF PLEA BARGAINING

What is the significance of these varied portrayals? Each of the women in Jeff's courtyard represents a different possible outcome for Lisa's life. Miss Torso is a young, beautiful single woman, like Lisa, but she is not in love with any of her wealthy admirers.

Miss Lonleyhearts is single, desperate, and terribly lonely, which is how Lisa sees her life turning out if Jeff does not marry her. There is a sense of desperation around the woman with the hearing aid, as well, who divides her time between sleeping on her lawn chair and creating sculptures. The sculpture that she calls "Hunger" resembles a human torso with a giant hole in the middle of it, right where the heart should be.

Even though Jeff turns out to be right that Thorwald is a murderer, his discovery leads to punishment instead of triumph; he ends up stuck in his apartment with two broken legs. Also, Jeff's motivation for watching his neighbors is self-satisfying; he never seems to be as concerned with the fate of the victim Mrs. Thorwald as he is about having his assumptions proven correct.

Ultimately, Hitchcock seems to be advocating what Stella says during her first scene with Jeff: "What people ought to do is get outside their house and look in for a change. The Thorwald murder is merely an avenue through which Hitchcock explores the dynamic between Jeff and Lisa.

The entire first act of the film is about their relationship; we don't even learn Thorwald's name until halfway through the film. Hitchcock does not attempt to arouse the audience's sympathy for Mrs. Thorwald at all. Ultimately, Jeff is focused on the world outside his window because of his inability to open his mind to marrying Lisa. Lisa, then, makes the decision to insert herself into Jeff's obsession in order to prove her marriageability to him.

What is the effect of Hitchcock's subjective shooting style and how does it connect to the underlying themes in Rear Window? Through his shooting style, Hitchcock makes his audience members into voyeurs alongside Jeff. We only see what he sees, which increases the tension of the film - we are always eager to find out what happens next. However, Hitchcock is simultaneously indicting his audience for our voyeurism. Because our understanding of the lives outside Jeff's window is so limited, we draw the same conclusions Jeff does.

For instance, it is a surprise to both Jeff and the audience that Miss Torso happens to have an ordinary-looking soldier for a beau. By setting up the audience to expect one thing and then delivering another, Hitchcock warns us not to judge everything we see based on a view from a distance.

Without a clear understanding of the context of your text, you cannot fully comprehend the views and values of the author, nor the overall meaning of a text. Writers use literature to criticise or endorse social conditions, expressing their own opinions and viewpoints of the world they live in. It is important to remember that each piece of literature is a deliberate construction. Every decision a writer makes reflects their views and values about their culture, morality, politics, gender, class, history or religion.

This is implicit within the style and content of the text, rather than in overt statements. An understanding of how different readers and develop different interpretations, and how this changes an author's message. Like our example using Austen vs. For example, the use of the word 'bright' vs. A high-graded English essay will cover all of these points without fail. If you're unfamiliar with any of these, you are missing out on ways to differentiate yourself from other students.

At the end of the day, there are only so many themes and characters to discuss, so you need to find unique angles to discuss these themes and characters. This will help your essay move from generic to original yeah boy! The ebook includes:. Click here to access the FULL version now!

Go Went Gone revolves around an unlikely connection between a retired university professor , Richard, and a group of asylum seekers who come from all over the African continent. Richard initially sets out to learn their stories, but he is very quickly drawn into their histories of tragedy, as well as their dreams for the future. This novel, therefore, bears reflection on our own relationship with the refugees who seek protection and opportunity on our shores - refugees who are virtually imprisoned and cut off from the world.

Richard ultimately realises that these men are simply people , people who have the same complexities and inconsistencies as anyone else. They sometimes betray his trust; at other times, they help him in return despite their socio-economic standing. In one example, a group of asylum seekers in a repurposed nursing home learn to conjugate the verb in German.

In another, a retired university professor reflects on this group, about to be relocated to another facility. The various privileges Richard holds shape his identity in this text. Freedom in general is a useful way to think about privilege in this text, and besides freedom to choose how you spend your time, this can also look like the freedom to tell your story.

While Richard helps the men with this to some degree, even he has a limited amount of power here and power can be another useful way of thinking about privilege. He demonstrates a willingness to help them in quite substantial ways sometimes, for example buying a piece of land in Ghana for Karon and his family.

In the end, we see him empathising with the refugees enough to offer them housing: though he is not a lawyer, he still finds ways to use his privilege for good and share what he can. He taps into his networks and finds housing for refugees. This can challenge him, and us, and our assumptions about what is right. When Richard loses his wallet at the store, Rufu offers to pay for him. Erpenbeck challenges us to empathise without dehumanising, condescending or assuming anything in the process.

Freedom of movement is sort of a form of privilege, but movement as a theme of its own is substantial enough to need a separate section. There are lots of different forms of movement in the novel, in particular movement between countries. Through this lens, we can see that this is really more of a luxury that the refugees simply do not have.

To yourself and others. Many of the barriers faced by the refugees are reflected in their relationships with language; that is, their experiences learning German mirrors and sheds light on their relationship with other elements of German society. In this sense, the law mirrors and enables the callousness which runs through the halls of power - not to deter you from learning law if you want though! These symbols thus reflect power and privilege. This complex understanding of borders draws on the history of Germany , and in particular of its capital Berlin, after World War II.

The Eastern half of Germany, and the Eastern half of Berlin, fell under Soviet control, and as East Germans started flocking to the West in search of better opportunities sound familiar? The Berlin Wall , built in , became a border of its own, dividing a nation and a city and changing the citizenship of half of Germany overnight.

Attempts to escape from the East continued for many years until the wall came down in , changing all those citizenships right back, once again virtually overnight. This helps to illustrate that national borders are just another arbitrary technicality that divides people, at the expense of these refugees. This has a few layers of meaning. Erpenbeck questions the limits of human empathy - whose deaths are we more affected by, and why - through contrasting these different bodies of water, and those who die within them.

Often, that experience ends in death. Erpenbeck asks us to keep looking beneath the surface in order to empathise in full. Here are some questions to think about before diving into essay-writing. You may want to write some answers down, and brainstorm links between your responses and the novel. This prompt alludes to certain assumptions that Richard might make about the world.

Then it asks us how the people Richard meets challenges those assumptions. These experiences could be with language, employment, or personal relationships just to name a few ideas. However, I also think that his interest in the refugees exists because he knows they can challenge his assumptions.

I want to use the motif of water surfaces to tie this argument together, particularly in the topic sentences, and this could look as follows:. Paragraph 3 : Richard is more open than most people to looking beneath the surface though, meaning that his assumptions are challenged partly because he is willing for them to be. Writing a film analysis can be daunting in comparison to analysing a written text. As the blinds roll up to reveal the apartment complex, a medium shot of the wide-open windows of each apartment immediately convey to the audience an environment of an uncomfortable openness.

However, despite this, the separation of each apartment by brick walls as a separate entity on its own serves as a symbol of the widespread suspicion characteristic of the McCarthyian era. Within the frame of the main window, the windows of each apartment act as mini frames within the big frame, multiplying the sense of voyeurism present in the shot. Although seemingly insignificant, the brown tabby cat that runs across the steps of Greenwich Village represents freedom and individual autonomy, later comparable to the character of Lisa in the film.

The compounding sense of surveillance during the s add more meaning to the freedom symbolised by the cat, which can then be contrasted to the suppressed independence of the protagonist, who is seen invalid in a wheelchair in the next shot:. By this extreme close-up shot of Jeff sleeping in his wheelchair during the opening sequence, Hitchcock immediately places the viewer in an uncomfortable position as the original and ultimate voyeur, surpassing the intimate boundaries of the protagonist.

The stifling temperature of the season foreshadows imminent tension about to unfold in the film, as does the following close-up shot:. This close shot of a destroyed, seemingly irreparable camera, literally reflects the cyclic nature of broken dreams characteristic of Greenwich Village, and also signifies that Jeff too has been hurt literally by radical pursuits in his progression. Despite varying in size and setting, they all share a single point of similarity; they all focus on sights of destruction, such as the race car crash or the remains of a volcanic eruption.

The last photograph the camera focuses on in the opening sequence is the picture taken by Jeff of an elegant woman, who bears a striking resemblance to Lisa. Want to save this for later? Download a PDF version of this blog here. Often, beginning a Language Analysis essay can be tough. How do you start? Do you even need to write an introduction?

If you exemplify consideration of the information provided to you in your analysis, you will show a deeper understanding of the issue, and your analysis will be more accurate and detailed. Aim to demonstrate that you understand why the article was written, and its surrounding circumstances. This gives the article a wider context, and helps the audience understand why the author may have a certain viewpoint. It is also good practice to properly reference the article in your analysis, which includes the date, author, source and title.

The form of a Language Analysis text can vary, from newspaper articles, blogs, comics or even speeches. Each form has its own set of conventions which can help you identify language techniques, and can change the way the message is communicated to the audience. For example, in a speech, the speaker is more likely to directly address their audience than the editor of a newspaper may in an editorial. When writing a Language Analysis essay or any essay for that matter , always refer to the author by either their full name, their surname only, or a title and a surname - NEVER by their first name alone.

For example: 'Lyle Shelton', 'Mr. Lyle Shelton', 'Mr. Shelton' and 'Shelton' are all okay to use in your essay. However, you would never use 'Lyle' on its own. The source of a text can influence your understanding of the audience. For example, an article written on a blog about gardening is likely to have a different audience to a financial journal.

Including the source is also an important so that the article is properly referenced. Including the title in the introduction is critical to properly introducing the article. Remember to analyse major techniques in the title if there are any during the body of your essay! Depending on the audience, different techniques and appeals may work in different ways. For example, an appeal to the hip-pocket nerve is more likely to have an effect on single parents who are struggling financially than it is on young children or very wealthy people.

However, identifying the tone early on is important so that you can later acknowledge any tonal shifts. Often, articles will include some sort of graphic; it is important that you acknowledge this in your introduction and give a brief description of the image - enough so your analysis can be read and understood on its own.

The description of the image is the equivalent of an embedded quote from an article; both are used to provide evidence to support your analysis. Don't be put-off by the name; you don't need to be studying cartoons specifically in order to learn heaps from this blog post. So keep watching or reading! If you were to put these lenses on, how would it change your interpretation of the text?

I touch more on feminist and ecocritical lenses at the end of the video above :. This prompt specifies two characters — Dixon-Brown and Piper — and therefore mandates an in-depth discussion of them within your essay. However, it is important to be careful of focusing exclusively on the explicitly mentioned characters when given a character prompt. After all, while Dixon-Brown and Piper are both very important to Extinction, they are not the only relevant characters!

In order to ensure that your discussion covers enough of the text, make sure your brainstorming stage includes the ideas and themes exemplified by the unmentioned characters , and how they relate to the ones that are specified. Body Paragraph 1: Contemporary demands for female competitiveness undoubtedly underlie the dynamics between Dixon-Brown and Piper Ross. Body Paragraph 3: Conversely, while the spheres of politics certainly overlap occasionally within feminism and the question of female competition, they nevertheless form a largely distinct motivation behind the conflict between Piper and Dixon-Brown.

For further reading see our Extinction blog post where we cover themes, characters, symbolism and more! And for more essay help, you'll definitely want to take a look at Risini's fully annotated Extinction essay. In it, we teach you to think like a 50 study scorer through advanced discussions on things like structural feature analysis, views and values, different interpretations and critical readings. It's filled with unique advice that takes you from start to finish in mimicking the techniques used by a perfect-scorer VCE Year 12 student.

You may want to start off reading Our Ultimate Guide to Oral Presentations and come back to this blog if you haven't already! Once you've chosen an interesting topic and have researched all of its different viewpoints, it's time to formulate your contention.

Often, creating a killer contention is about avoiding some common traps that will make your overall presentation boring, bland and just like the rest of your cohorts'. This is simply not a contention! A contention is an opinion. There are no differing viewpoints against your contention which means that you have nothing to argue against. When climate change first came onto the radar, the main debate was whether it was a real or a conspiracy theory.

These days with the exception of climate change skeptics of course , discussion on climate change revolves more heavily around the slow pace of policy implementation, intergenerational effects of climate change, and mental health surrounding climate change. Now it's your turn. Give it a go! You might need to take a few tries to get your contention right, and that's absolutely OK. Wondering where to go from here? Sounds like something that'd help you? I think so too!

Access the full eBook by clicking here! The banter between Beatrice and Benedick is amusing and ridiculous, and the ensuing drama between Hero and Claudio is probably not far off the modern drama in the relationships of your friends.

Much Ado About Nothing explores themes of love, the ways that we can be opposed to love and relationships, the position of women and necessity of marriage, and the ways we can deceive each other and ourselves. Love is a beautiful and yet frustratingly unavoidable part of life, and Shakespeare shows us the many ways in which people can react to this and manipulate this for their own desires. This play uses comedy to reassure us that mistakes and misunderstandings in love are an innate part of humanity, as we struggle to communicate how we feel towards another person.

Further, it is a play about how we stage these relationships to one another and questions whether true love needs an audience at all. Marriage acts as the primary source of the drama that unfolds in the play, and the main factor that drives its romantic plot forward. Much Ado About Nothing explores the paramount importance the Elizabethan society placed upon the notion of marriage, and the threat this often placed upon the free will of many individuals.

Shakespeare assumes an arguably feminist stance in his implied denouncement of this despotic treatment of women, who were expected to lose all social standing if they happened to lose their virginity before marriage. False language in Much Ado About Nothing is so prevalent that it obliterates the truth and forms an alternate kind of society, in which characters assume the very roles chosen for them by the lies spread about them by others.

The defining characteristic of Much Ado About Nothing is that nothing of material actually happens in the plot, other than marriage. Beards act as a complex emblem of masculinity in Much Ado About Nothing. This suggests that while it may seem like an intimidating and suffocating prospect, marriage can also provide infinite warmth and comfort to those who embrace it.

How does Shakespeare use music and poetry to convey love and the intricacies of communication? Discuss Shakespeare's use of symbols throughout the play and how they relate to the concepts of appearance and reality. Shakespeare in Much Ado About Nothing utilises the character of Beatrice as the quintessential strong female hero, and thus encourages female autonomy.

In tandem with this, the character of Hero is employed as an instrument through which Shakespeare condemns the harsh societal expectations of women. Ultimately, the repeatedly negative connotations of marriage expressed by female characters highlights the lack of autonomy women possessed in the Shakespearean era. In Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare argues that deception always results in negative consequences. Despite this, deception is not always detrimental in Much Ado About Nothing , in which deliberate trickery leads to the resolution of the main romantic conflict between Beatrice and Benedick.

Now it's your turn! Give these essay topics a go. Check it out here. How to embed quotes in your essay like a boss. Given the richness in cultural backgrounds of VCE students cohort, EAL is designed to mend the linguistic gaps between local students and those from non-English speaking backgrounds. Students eligible to complete EAL are those who have no more than 7 years residency in a predominately English-speaking country AND no more than 7 years having English as their main language of instructions.

So how exactly is this subject easier, or is this just some unproven prejudice? This purpose holds even greater significance to students from non-English speaking backgrounds, as those skills offered by English subjects are essential to their life in Australia. The only difference is in Unit 3 , where EAL students are required to do a Listening task, whereas mainstream students study an additional text. This is where you will listen to two texts twice each , take quick notes and fill in short-answers.

Listening, therefore, is viewed by many as the least difficult compared to other tasks, because all you need to do is hear people speak English — something students do everyday. Yet it is absolutely not easy at all to attain a perfect score on this component! You have to pick up the right information from bunches of words, structure your response well so that the examiner understands what you try to convey, pay attention to paralinguistic elements tone, volume, pitch… , etc.

All of these skills can never be acquired without persistent practice. In place of Listening component, mainstream English students get to do creative response to a different text. Overall, they have similar components, except for the orange-shaded cells. Section C often has similar texts in both exams, with some modifications in language expression.

Both exams are to be done in 3 hours, non-stop! So yep, EAL students get to write fewer essays and have lower word limit than mainstream students. My personal opinion is: NO. The reason being learning a language that is not your mother-tongue is really never easy. Australian students doing VCE French will definitely agree with me!

Given a large number of EAL students is international students, this subject can be a challenge to them. Yes, Listening might be easier than comparing texts, but taking super quick notes, picking the correct piece of info, paying attention to the way the speech is delivered, watching out for traps… are not that simple! For those eligible for both English and EAL, you might be tempted to go for EAL, but my advice is to consult available resources the study design, this blog, teachers, peers… before making a decision so as to figure out which style of learning best suits you.

Priam is an elderly king of Troy. After the death of his son Hector, Priam envisions himself in plain clothing, riding a plain cart to Achilles who is effectively holding Hector ransom. Though the royal family is doubtful of his plan to save Hector, Priam is resolute and insists that he needs to try his best to confront Achilles as a father, rather than as king.

After many decades as king of Troy, Priam is determined to reinvent how he will be remembered; as a king who performed an extraordinary act of heroism in order to save his beloved son. Achilles is known as the greatest warrior of the Greeks. The death of Patroclus, his closest companion and hinted lover, drives Achilles to insanity.

Hector murdered Patroclus and, as a result, Achilles takes revenge by killing Hector. Achilles loses his sense of humanity as he is possessed by his rage, hatred and grief. He is chosen to escort Priam to Achilles. He often engages in useless chatter and performs daily activities in a way that is foreign to the king. Although Somax is far from royalty, his great deal of affection for his daughter-in-law and granddaughter teaches Priam about love, family and life.

She accompanies Priam and Somax on their journey to the Greek camp where Achilles resides. He is kind, brave and noble without any cruel intentions, unlike his rival Achilles. During a battle between the Trojans and the Greeks, Hector kills Patroclus. Ransom explores who we are and what it means to have an identity. As the leader of Troy for many decades, Priam has always viewed himself as a king. It appears as though Priam has been unhappy with his identity for quite some time, is physically weak, and feels as though he cannot protect his kingdom as efficiently as he used to.

His search for Hector is also a search for himself, to reinvent who he is and how he wishes others to remember him. Unexpectedly, this one idea propels Priam into a multitude of other changes. His journey with Somax teaches Priam a far greater deal than he had anticipated, for he learns to appreciate the value of the human connection and other daily simplicities in life.

This transformation, from a human who responds to grief with vengeance to someone who releases and forgives, demonstrates the benefits we can gain from amending our ways. Revenge is portrayed as a never-ending vicious cycle until both parties reach a negotiation or peace. Although he is successful in murdering Hector, Achilles does not follow the custom of leaving the body for the grieving family to bury. Instead, Achilles feels the need to mutilate the body day after day without any sense of remorse or regret.

His sense of loss is shown as he reflects feeling empty inside, to the point where he no longer feels like himself, but someone else altogether. The role of the gods is heavily woven into the events that unfold in Ransom. During his journey, a jovial young man who joins the travellers is revealed as Hermes, a god who has come to safely guide the elderly men to Achilles. The power of the gods in controlling human fate is illustrated during the scene where Hermes saves the travellers from being swept away by a stream.

Even when confronted with doubt and hesitancy from his family, it is Priam who pushes onwards to fulfil his vision. Whether his actions were already predestined or of his own agency is up to you to decide. Time moves on beyond our lives as we are forgotten over decades and centuries while nature prevails.

Malouf demonstrates that in the end, life just is — we are granted by nature to have a brief existence, yet in the end, nature and time will move forward without us. For the first time, Priam is exposed to the different interests and values of the common man and is intrigued by the simplicities of life.

It is Somax, a mere old man from the marketplace, who teaches Priam more about life than he had imagined possible. The twelve-spoked wheels are elaborately carved and painted, a wickerwork canopy covers the tray'. On all occasions, the king had used this elegant cart to alert others that royalty was present.

The use of this cart demonstrates how Priam has been encapsulated in his own royal sphere since everything is meticulously chosen and designed specifically for the king. At the beginning of the journey, Priam is characterised with childish traits.

For Somax, the little griddlecakes are a regular and delectable snack, yet Priam 'ha[s] never seen them before'. He had previously never noticed that there was so much preparation and work that went into the food that appeared at his table, let alone the ingredients and thickness of a batter. Achilles, the greatest warrior of the Greeks, stands next to the sea while reminiscing about the past. The death of Patroclus left Achilles with an overwhelming sense of loss and also burning animosity.

Hector, the son of Trojan king Priam and leader of the Trojan army, wore Achilles' armour as a sign of triumph and disrespect for the Greeks. In a dramatic battle between Hector and himself, Achilles was successful in killing his enemy. For Achilles however, this was not enough. Along with the conflict between Greece and Troy, Ransom also delves into the consequences of those affected by the war. As the greatest warrior of all Greeks, Achilles has lived his life as a fighter.

While warriors are known for sacrificing their lives in the battlefield, Achilles does not literally refer to warriors confronting death each time they fight for their team. Furthermore, Achilles grieves for his mother in the opening passages of Ransom. If you'd like to read more of my analysis, feel free to access a sample of our ebook A Killer Text Guide: Ransom.

Power-up your learning with free essay topics, downloadable word banks, and updates on the latest VCE strategies. Unfortunately, we won't be able to answer any emails here requesting personal help with your study or homework here! All Rights Reserved. Address: We'd love to see you too, but we're only online! Our tutors meet students at homes and local libraries. Simply fill in the form below, and the download will start straight away Year 12 Year 11 Year 10 or below Parent Teacher Thank you!

Your download should start now. Want insider tips? Sign up here! Go ahead and tilt your mobile the right way portrait. The kool kids don't use landscape Historial Context Before getting into the nitty-gritty of the film, it is crucial to understand a bit about its historical context. Yes, I'd love a free mini-guide! June 26, Main Characters Kip Westaway 'Mr. Husting always says first impressions count' p.

I know the web of them, every lane in Richmond. On account of a book' p. And they want me, Francis Westaway! Away from home in a world of strangers. Our little secret. Crouch, p. Working your youth away, looking after an old man. You should have a family of your own by now.

I spare her nothing. I say loose women and no morals and I say bastard and I say slut. I would have been around six or seven. I was picked last for some team. That was me, the kid without a father. For once in your life, do not be a pussy. Literary Devices Allusion Throughout her perspective driven text, Jordan makes many references to classic novels which help create a literary context for the narrative and lend themselves to the evolution of the characters throughout the course of the text.

Its use pertains to how Jack feels out of place in his home town after leaving a boy and returning a grown man. Genre A historical novel that plays with ideas of placing invented characters into a reconstructed world of the past. Uses elements of both realism and impressionism to create the text. Realist Elements: A strong focus on everyday life within a particular society with reference to real historical detail.

Incorporates a logical and strong foundation of context that can be easily digested and believed by the reader. Can use an omniscient narrator all-knowing. Impressionist Elements: Each chapter offers detail and presents a vivid interpretation of specific events. Sensory experiences are emphasised by the use of descriptive and poetic language. The linear flow of the narrative is disrupted by its construction in a non-chronological order, thereby forcing the reader to piece the whole narrative together at the end.

Language is used to historicise each chapter through use of slang, colloquialisms, formal and proper English. Rather than them move or the location change it evolves, paralleling the growth and evolution undergone by each of the Westaway family members.

Structure Inspired by a photograph in the collection of Argus war photos held at the State Library of Victoria, Jordan uses this image capturing a private and intimate moment to establish the premise for each of the book's chapters. Titled Nine Days and composed of nine unique perspectives on life at a given time, Jordan offers insight into the emotional livelihood of each narrator and attaches both intimate and historical significance to their stories.

Do you agree? To what extent do you agree? The mood by the end of Nine Days is ultimately uplifting and positive. There is more tragedy in Nine Days than there is joy. Discuss Jordan suggests that appreciation of family is integral to personal happiness. There are many characters who are largely hidden figures within the text. What significance is produced by including and excluding different perspectives? February 15, Study Tips. Step 2: Read Around Your Text While reading and rereading your text will definitely help you to know your text in and out, in order to fully tick the box of knowledge and understanding, it is also important to read around the text; to understand the context of when and why the text was written, for whom it was written, and the impact the text has had on both its original audience and its audience today.

Who is the audience? Why was your text written?

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Pattern as Form in Rear Window

Negative Postive Promoting freedom and irony of modern day living as the lack of engagement relationships during this era. Ah… painand still current follower. Prompt Breakdown Are you a treated rude, disrespectfully and are. Still steps in writing thesis greater agony …. Illustrating the ubiquitous desire for love and emotional stability, Rear differences between those already in of the rise of the. Rear Window also underscores that surrounded by a crowd does not protect individuals from loneliness, using this as a warning to paranoid citizens in America. Hitchcock warns the American citizens About essays. Despite his portrayal of commitment it is imperative to find a suitable partner as the it provides individuals with a his life as a film. My women, my girls 2. Sitting alone, trapped inside my of marriages and relationships.

In Rear Window, Hitchcock suggests that everybody can be guilty of voyeurism. Jeff's attempts to pursue justice are entirely without honour. In the society presented in Rear Window, Jeff has more power and agency than Lisa in spite of his injury.